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April 2014

Tuesday 6 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
18:00 Doing Good Business - The evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Eritrea
Todd Romaine, and Lloyd Lipsett.
A live case study on the development and implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Eritrea. Bisha is Eritrea’s first modern mine. It is a joint venture between Canadian mining company Nevsun Resources Limited (60%) and the Government of Eritrea (40%). Todd Romaine, VP CSR, discusses his work of operationalising a CSR strategy in Eritrea for Nevsun. He also discusses the historical allegations brought forward by a NGO and Nevsun’s response. Lloyd Lipsett, International Human Rights Lawyer worked closely with Todd Romaine in responding to this comprehensive time sensitive study and shares his experience. Chair: Ruby Sandhu, Vice-Chair, SIHRG and heads BES; Lawyer, Mediator, Facilitator on CSR and Sustainability. Todd Romaine, VP, CSR Nevsun Resources Limited.  Todd is responsible for Nevsun’s CSR program in Eritrea. This includes strat-egy, governance and communications pertaining to human rights, environmental management, crisis management. His role involved regular dialogue and negotiations with the Eritrean and Canadian Govern­ment officials, the United Nations, mainstream media and international NGOs with regards to domestic and international political matters. He is also responsible for Nevsun’s due diligence and risk management for projects globally. Lloyd Lipsett,  is an international lawyer with over 15 years of experience working with leading companies, governments and commu-nities on issues related to human rights, CSR and governance for the extractive sector. He has developed a niche in the emerging field of human rights impact assessment with a focus on assisting companies and project-affected communities identify and address opportunities and risks associated with human rights, anti-corruption and CSR. This event is FREE but those wishing to attend are asked to register in advance.  To register, please use the automatic form below or on the SIHRG Website Arranged with the Solicitors International Human Rights Group (SIHRG) and the Society for Advanced Legal Studies (SALS).            
IALS

Monday 12 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
14:30 Roadmap progress: where we are now on pan European Defence Rights?
Caroline Morgan, DG Justice, European Commission; Jago Russell, Fair Trials International; Chair: Professor John Spencer, Cambridge University.
Details to be announced. Speakers to include Professor John Spencer and Professor Estella Baker. Organised with the European Criminal Law Association (UK).          
IALS

Tuesday 13 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
15:00 Methodology of Legal History

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER TOMLINS,  Chancellor's Professor of Law at University of California, Irvine, Affiliated Research Professor with The American Bar Foundation, Chicago, and from July 2014, Professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law.   Distinguished Visiting Fellow in May 2014 at in the School of History and the School of Law at Queen Mary, University of London. Commentators:  Professor Eric Heinze (Queen Mary); Professor Axel Korner (UCL); Professor Gareth Stedman-Jones (Queen Mary); Professor David Sugarman (Lancaster).  This seminar is free but those wishing to attend must register in advance.   To register, please visit the QMUL Eventbrite page. Organised with the Centre for Law and Society in a Global Context at Queen Mary, University of London.
IALS

Wednesday 14 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
18:00 Innovation and Continuity in Law Making (Sir William Dale Memorial Lecture)
Richard Heaton, First Parliamentary Counsel and Permanent Secretary at the Cabinet Office. Chair:  Rachel Sandby-Thomas, Director General, BIS, with responsibility for Legal, Better Regulation, Enterprise and Skills.
The annual Sir William Dale Memorial Lecture is organised by the Centre for Legislative Studies at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. This event is FREE but those wishing to attend should register in advance.  To register, please use the automatic form below.  
IALS

Monday 19 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
10:00 Law, Gender and Sexuality: sources and methods in socio-legal research

This event, organised collaboratively by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS), the Socio-Legal Studies Association and the British Library, aims is to draw attention to archives and their content that newcomers to the field may not be aware of and to consider the methodological and practical issues involved in analysing sources. For a copy of the programme, please click here Presentations: Feminism and the Law: Feminist Judgments  -   Professor Rosemary Hunter (University of Kent Law School) Feminist approaches to sexuality and law scholarship  -  Professor Rosemary Auchmuty (University of Reading School of Law)  Multi Collection Repositories: Sisterhood and after: an archive of social and legislative change?  -  Dr Polly Russell (British Library)  British Library collection highlights for research on  law, gender and sexuality  -  Jon Sims (British Library) Highlights from LSE  library including Hall Carpenter Archives and specialist collections of the Women’s Library@lse  -  Heather Dawson  (London School of Economics Library) Law and Same Sex Partnerships Queering Genealogy through Wills  -  Daniel Monk (Reader in Law, Birkbeck, University of London ) Popular culture as sources for research on law in lesbian and gay lives  -  Dr Rosie Harding (Birmingham Law School)  Legal Professions and Education The IALS Archives of Legal Education -  Elizabeth Dawson (Institute of Advanced Legal Studies) Researching the UK's first female law professor: thinking about gender, method and sources  -  Professor Fiona Cownie (Keele University School of Law)  On Researching Men, Masculinities and Law: The Examples of Fatherhood and the Legal profession  -  Professor Richard Collier (Professor of Law and Social Theory, Newcastle University) Visual Sources & Methods in Law, Gender and Sexuality scholarship Images and archives: law , gender and sexuality  -  Professor Leslie Moran (Birkbeck, University of London) The scene of the crime: police photographs, visual culture and sexuality  -  Dr Dominic Janes (Birkbeck, University of London) Legal treasures: on the shelf and online   -  Professor Amanda Perry-Kessaris (University of Kent Law School REGISTRATION AND PAYMENTS:   For on-line booking and payments, please click here Registration fees: Full Rate: £70.00.  Members of the SLSA: £60.00.   Reduced rate for students: £30.00  For further information and queries, please email IALS.Events@sas.ac.uk             
IALS
18:00 Title to be confirmed (on commercial/company law)
Dr Orkun Akseli, University of Durham
IALS

Wednesday 21 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
10:15 How to get a PhD in Law: Preparing yourself for the vivas. Getting yourself known - presenting skills, publishing your work, and networking.
Professor Avrom Sherr, Director of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; Dr Constantin Stefanou, Senior Lecturer in Law, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies;  Richard Hart, Managing Director, Hart Publishing, Oxford;  Dr Jane Winters, Head of Publications and IHR Digital at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London;  Steven Whittle, Information Systems Manager, IALS Library; Lisa Davies, Access Librarian, IALS Library.  
MPhil/PhD law students from across the UK are warmly invited to attend this specially tailored day of presentations and networking opportunities at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. Topics to include: Preparing yourself for the Ethics Committee - Professor Avrom Sherr, Director on Sabbatical, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London; Practical presenting skills for your work and yourself - Dr Constantin Stefanou, Senior Lecturer in Law, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London; Preparing for the mini Viva and the Viva - Professor Avrom Sherr; What books are law publishers looking to publish? - Richard Hart, Managing Director, Hart Publishing, Oxford; Getting your research published in journals - Dr Jane Winters, Head of Publications and IHR Digital at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London; Publishing in Open Access online law journals - Steven Whittle, Information Systems Manager, IALS Library; Tips on keeping up-to-date with your topic after completion - Lisa Davies, Access Librarian, IALS Library.  Although tailored specifically for PhD in Law students, this training programme does contain some material which repeats and reinforces generic training suitable for all PhD students. For a copy of the programme, please click here REGISTRATION AND PAYMENTS:   For on-line booking and payments, please click here Registration Fee for 21 May : £65.00.   (Reduced rate for IALS students only: £20.00). Other National Training Days in 2013-2014 are: Saturday 1 March 2013: What legal research skills will I need?  Literature Reviews, qualititive and quantitive research and comparative legal research.  For queries, contact Belinda.Crothers@sas.ac.uk .  
IALS
18:00 The Counter-Terrorist Court Over Time: a Case Study of Northern Ireland’s Diplock Courts
Professor Colm Campbell, Transitional Justice Institute,  University of Ulster, Northern Ireland; IALS Visiting Fellow
While there have been a number of studies of special courts, each has tended to focus on a discrete phase in the tribunal’s operation. By contrast this presentation draws on new empirical data from court records, covering interrogation through to trial, to chart the development of Northern Ireland’s juryless ‘Diplock courts’ over a 40-year period. Amongst other things, the study considers the extent to which the operation of these courts could be said to have had a heuristic dimension, with later examples of the courts abandoning features of earlier trials that had attracted adverse comment.
IALS

Friday 23 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
18:00 Priests of the Law: Royal Justices and Legal-Literary Culture in 13th-Century England
Dr Thomas McSweeney, Marshall-Whyte School of Law, College of William & Mary, USA
Organised with the London Legal History Seminar. This event is FREE but those wishing to attend should register in advance. To register, please use the the automatic form below.  
IALS

Wednesday 28 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
18:00 Tanzania: Corruption and Human Rights
Evarist Chahali and Sarah Hermitage.
Many African countries including Tanzania have accepted democracy without successfully adopting the institutional reforms to support it such as an accountable and transparent rule of law:  A situation which facilitates corruption and human rights abuses. Evarist Chahali, a doctoral student of political studies and a former Tanzanian Intelligence and State Security Officer will outline the origin, form and extent of corruption in Tanzania and the capacity of the anti-corruption bodies to address it. Sarah Hermitage is a British Lawyer forced from her farm in Tanzania in 2008 after a four-year campaign of violence and abuse by state institutions.  Her husband and staff were arrested and imprisoned, and a close friend almost hacked to death.   After blogging her experiences she successfully defended a UK Libel claim by Tanzanian media mogul Reginald Mengi in 2012. Sarah will describe how corruption in the police and judiciary is used to systematically deny human rights especially, access to law.  She will also argue that the situation is complicated by donor insistence on strict adherence to core principles of democracy in particular, the separation of Powers. This event is FREE but those wishing to attend are asked to register in advance.  To register, please use the automatic form below or email Belinda.Crothers@sas.ac.uk Arranged with the Solicitors International Human Rights Group (SIHRG www.sihrg.org) and the Society for Advanced Legal Studies (SALS).            
IALS

Thursday 29 May 2014

TimeTitleVenue
11:00 National Security and Public Health: Exceptions to Human Rights?

Keynote Speaker:  Professor Malcolm Dando, Professor of International Security, University of Bradford, on  "Threats of dual use biomedical research - when national security and public health collide". NATIONAL SECURITY PANEL Chair:  Dr Peter Lee Dr Dina Hadad: "States of Exception and National Security: Exceptional Threat vs. Exceptional Rights" Dr Myriam Feinberg: "Conflicts of Sovereignty in International Counterterrorism: the Kadi Case" Solon Solomon: "National Security Debates in the Framework of Israeli Constitutionalism" Dimitrios Kagiaros: "The Assessment of Damage to National Security in Disclosures from Whistleblowers in the Security and Intelligence Community in the UK" Professor Jonathan Hafetz: "Targeted Drones Strikes and the Future of International Human Rights"  PUBLIC HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS PANEL Chair: Dr John Coggon Dr Brigit Toebes: “The Right to Health, National Security and Public Health: An Uneasy Relationship” Dr Laura Niada: “Individual v public health in the human right to medicines: the problematic identification of ‘essential medicines’” Dr Simisola Akintola: “Public Health versus Human Rights: An examination of the tensions between Individual Rights and Public Health in Biobanking Research” Dr Dobrochna Bach-Golecka: “Public Health and Private Health: The Impact of EU Law on Healthcare in the Member States” Professor Joachim Sanden and Dr Sacha-Dominik Bachmann: "The Right to Liberty and Security, Public Health and Disease Control" Dr Andraz Zidar: "WHO International Health Regulations, the Rule of Law and the Protection of International Human Rights" Conference Convenors:  Dr Myriam Feinberg and Dr Laura Niada. For a copy of the Conference Programme, please click here REGISTRATION AND PAYMENTS:   For on-line booking and payments, please click here Registration Fee for 29 May:   Full Rate: £75.00 Students: £40.00. For further information and developments, see the separate Conference website at:  www.rightsandexceptions.webs.com For a copy of the Call for Papers, click here
IALS

Monday 2 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
18:00 Title to be confirmed (on the Courts, jurors and social/electronic media)
Professor Ian Cram, Professor of Comparative Constitutioinal Law, University of Leeds; IALS Visiting Fellow
IALS

Wednesday 4 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
09:00 The design of a new Brazilian Commercial Code and the challenges of an emerging economy
Brazil: Professor Fabio Ulhoa Coelho; Dr Armando Luiz Rovai; Dr Marcelo Guedes Nunes;  UK: Dr Marc Moore;  Jonathan Teasdale;  Dr Orkun Akseli. 
There is a worldwide tendency to modernise the commercial and corporate legislation, particularly following the United States and the European Union law reforms, and the guidelines of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). The draft of a new Commercial Code has been recently proposed to the Brazilian Congress, aiming to increase legal certainty in business relationships, modernise and simplify the accounting system, update the Bankruptcy Act, strengthen self-regulation and improve the business environment in Brazil. This seminar focuses on three main topics. The first one is the legal certainty in the regulation of commercial relationships in Common Law and in Civil Law systems. The second one is the importance of trade in a globalised economy. And the third one is the future of Commercial and Corporate Law in the UK and in Brazil. The discussions will emphasise the exchange of legal experiences in both countries. Speakers: Professor Fabio Ulhoa Coelho, Commercial Law Department, Faculty of Law, Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC-SP), Lawyer, General-Rapporteur of Brazilian Senate the Law Committee responsible for the draft of the new Code; Dr Armando Luiz Rovai, Senior Lecturer in Commercial Law, Faculty of Law, Mackenzie University, São Paulo, President of the Commercial Registry of the State of São Paulo; Dr Marcelo Guedes Nunes, Lawyer, President of the Brazilian Association of Jurimetrics; Dr Marc Moore, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Commercial Law, Faculty of Laws, University College London; Mr Jonathan Teasdale, former Law Commission lawyer, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London; Dr Orkun Akseli, Senior Lecturer in Commercial Law, Durham University Law School. Convenors: Paulo Rosenblatt, Marcelo Ilarraz and Bruno Caraciolo For further information and the programme, please click here This event is free but those wishing to attend are requested to register in advance, either by using the reply form below, or by emailing: IALS.Events@sas.ac.uk 
IALS

Monday 9 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
Certificate in International Commercial and Investment Arbitration 2014

Course Director:  Professor Ilias Bantekas, Brunel University and IALS Associate Research Fellow. This is a five-day intensive course that is aimed at introducing participants to international commercial and investment arbitration. The course covers the foundations of arbitration, contractual issues, choice of law, appointment of arbitrators and their powers, conduct of proceedings and other procedural matters and the role of national courts.  By the end of the course it is expected that participants will possess a solid understanding of arbitration law and practice. The course is aimed at legal practitioners with little, or no prior, knowledge of arbitration and alternative dispute settlement who wish to gain knowledge and skill that will allow them to pursue a career in this field. Moreover, it is also aimed at non-lawyers, such as engineers, who are considering working as technical experts or arbitrators. Finally, the course is suitable for law students interested in a specialisation in arbitration. Language Requirement:   Teaching will be in English. Students will need to be fluent in written and verbal English and need to be either a native speaker of English or have experience of studying in English at university level; or have achieved an appropriate level in one of the following certificates: TOEFL, IELTS; CAE; CPE; or equivalent. Certificate Awarded:  Following completion of the course, for which attendance is compulsory, participants will receive a Certificate (of Attendance) of International Commercial and Investment Arbitration from the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, of the University of London’s School of Advanced Study. Course Dates: The compulsory core sessions will be taught from Monday 9 June to Friday 14 June (with an additional optional session on Saturday 15 June). REGISTRATION AND PAYMENTS:  For on-line booking and payments please click here. Course Fees:  £1,500. The price includes refreshments and course notes.  Application: The deadline for applications is: 2 June 2013.  Applicants are advised to apply as early as possible because of increased competition for places and to avoid delays with travel visas where applicable. For a copy of the course poster, please click here Enquiries:   Belinda.Crothers@sas.ac.uk This course has been accredited by the Bar Standards Board with 20 CPD hours. IALS reserves the right to cancel this course in the event of insufficient uptake.          The Institute acknowledes with gratitude the support of TDM.   
IALS
Course in Legislative Drafting 2014
 
The Course in Legislative Drafting was first offered in 1964, under the name of “The Government Legal Advisers Course”. Since then it has been attended by more than 3,000 legal officials from 90 countries, mostly from within the Commonwealth. Many of these officers have attained posts of great distinction either in the service of their Governments or in international organisations. From its modest beginnings in the 1960s, the Course in Legislative Drafting has grown to become the most renowned training programme in legislative drafting. Since 1998 the course is offered under the auspices of the Sir William Dale Centre for Legislative Studies at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS), School of Advanced Study (SAS), University of London. The host institution follows, and is audited on the basis of, the UK’s framework for academic quality assurance in all its programmes of study. Emphasis is placed on the quality of its lecturers, coherence in structure, encouragement of participation, an academic (rather than commercial) approach to learning, regular review of courses, and post hoc monitoring through regular feedback. The aim of the course is to empower, rather than prescribe, national drafters to apply best international drafting practices to their own legal system reflecting their own political, cultural, and social intricacies. The programme promotes best practices in statutory drafting, as exemplified in the work of Sir William Dale, Professor Helen Xanthaki, and Dr. Constantin Stefanou. Central to the programme is the belief that barriers between “developed” and “transitional” jurisdictions, between common and civil law traditions, between continents and countries are overrated: all drafters can learn from the experience of others provided that lessons learnt serve the same functionality test, and are subsequently naturalised in the context of national eccentricities. The rich multi-cultural, multi-lingual, and multi-jurisdictional tradition of the Course as a learning environment enriches drafters with innovative solutions, and a unique preview of the insight of others who have already applied and reviewed them. The Course has created a distinctive school of drafting which encourages modern drafting techniques with emphasis on effective and user-friendly legislation, and exposure to a variety of drafting styles and lecturers, thus allowing participants to select elements that best suit their national laws, and their own tradition, culture, and jurisprudence. The Course is suitable for both experienced and inexperienced drafters.  The main lecturers of the Course are Professor Helen Xanthaki and Dr. Constantin Stefanou. Professor Xanthaki is the Academic Director of the Sir William Dale Centre, Professor of Law and Legislative Drafting at the University of London, an international author and consultant in Legislative Drafting; a Co-Director to the LLM in ALS via DL; the Convenor of the Legislative Drafting module at the LLM programmes; and the Chair of the Drafting Clinic. Dr. Stefanou is the LLM Director for ALS and Co-Director for ALS via DL, a Senior Lecturer of the University of London; an international author and consultant in the field of the legislative process; and the Convenor of the Comparative Legislative Studies module at the LLM programmes of the IALS. The course draws additional expertise from a pool of serving and retired public figures of international standing among whom are senior professional drafters, practising lawyers, and Sir William Dale Fellows. These include Richard Nzerem, former Director of the Legal and Constitutional Affairs Division of the Commonwealth Secretariat and The Director of the Sir William Dale Centre; Daniel Greenberg, former OPC, IALS Fellow, General Editor of the Westlaw UK Annotated Statutes, editor of Craies on Legislation, Stroud's Judicial Dictionary and Jowitt's Dictionary of English Law; Jonathan Teasdale, former Law Commission, IALS Fellow; John Moloney, Department for the Environment, EIRE, IALS Fellow; John Gilhooly, former Executive, PCO, IALS Fellow; Hayley Rogers, OPC, IALS Fellow; and Lydia Clapinska, OPC, IALS Fellow. For a copy of the complete course brochure, please click here;  and for the application form, please click here. Fees:  Tuition Fee only:  £4,995, or  The Package:  Tuition Fees, Accommodation and Meals:  £6,399. Following acceptance on to the course, details will be sent the options available for paying the course fees, including payment by credit/debit card using the University's online payment system. For further information about the Centre for Legislative Studies, you may access its website at http://www.ials.sas.ac.uk/postgrad/courses/cls_legislative_drafting_course.htm.    
IALS

Tuesday 17 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
12:00 "Statute? What Statute?” – Norm hierarchy and judicial law-making in international criminal law: The example of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Professor Michael Bohlander, Professor of Comparative and Internaitonal Criminal Law, University of Durham; Sir William Dale Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Legislative Studies, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.
The history of international criminal procedure until the advent of the ICC has substantially been one of cobbling together building blocks from different traditions in order to create a new sui generis system based on extrapolations from Article 38(1) of the Statute of the ICJ and the history of Nuremberg, Tokyo and the other post-war military tribunals. This eclectic approach has unfortunately been combined with a plethora of regulatory lacunae left to the judges of the tribunals by the international law-making bodies, a criticism that applies to the ICC as well, albeit clearly to a lesser degree. The "sui generis" system seems nonetheless to have had mainly adversarial overtones. Even in cases where the Statute of a tribunal, such as the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, provides for the adaptation of a specific civil law model, the court's judges in their rule-making power have blindsided the drafters of the Statute and introduced a way for the court to revert to what is in essence an adversarial model. The paper will address some of the key critical issues, and query whether they may be an indicator of an emerging trend of adversarial preference based mainly on the personnel involved in international criminal proceedings and uncoupled from principled reasoning about the sources of international law.
IALS

Thursday 19 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
Caribbean Integration Law
Dr David S Berry, Dean of Law, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados
IALS

Monday 23 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
Legal Education and Training and the Professions (W G Hart Legal Workshop 2014)

Academic Directors: Professor Avrom Sherr, Woolf Professor of Legal Education, Director on Sabbatical, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; Professor Richard Moorhead, Director, Centre of Ethics and Law,  University College London; Professor Hilary Sommerlad, Research Director, Centre for Professional Legal Education and Research, Birmingham Law School, Birmingham.  Plenary and panel speakers include: Richard Abel, UCLA; Harry Arthurs, Osgoode Hall Law School; David Wilkins, Harvard (tbc); Louise Ashley, Kent; Anthony Bradney, Keele; Jane Ching and Rebecca Huxley-Binns, Nottingham Law School;  Richard Collier, Newcastle; Fiona Cownie, Keele; Egle Dagilyte and Peter Coe, Buckinghamshire; Haydn Davies and Emma Flint, Birmingham City; Nigel Duncan, City University; Kim Economides, Flinders, Adelaide;  Nina Fletcher, The Law Society; John Flood, Westminster; Jessica Guth, Bradford; Matt Harvey, Victoria University, Melbourne; John Hodgson, Nottingham Trent; Nicola Jones;  Eyal Katvan, College of Law and Business, Israel; Matthias Kilian, Köln; Andrew Le Sueur, Essex and  David Marrani, Institute of Law, Jersey;  Patricia Leighton, South Wales; Julian Lonbay Birmingham; Michael Lower, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Paul Maharg and Elizabeth Lee, Australian National University;  Donald Nicholson, Strathclyde; Richard Owen, Essex;  Wes Pue, British Columbia; Penelope Russell, Sheffield; Andrew Sanders, Birmingham;  Susan Scott Hunt, Middlesex and Susan Watson, Kingston University; Maureen Spencer, Middlesex; David Sugarman and Sanaa Al Sarghali, Lancaster; Caroline Strevens and Clare Wilson University of Portsmouth; Nima Mersadi Tabari, Kings College London; Lisa Webley, Westminster. Call for Papers:  The Legal Education Review (LETR) has produced its research report, but its recommendations generate many questions. For instance, it has suggested an approach which could transcend the boundaries between the different legal professions. As a result, the LSB is pushing regulators towards evidence- and risk-based policy and the SRA are indicating a bonfire of the regulations - but do we know enough about the interactions between regulation and education to justify this move? Another of the report’s key proposals is that legal education be shaped by outcomes unlike those currently governing education and training.  However, if drawn at too high a conceptual level, such competencies might be too vague to be useful, yet if they are more tightly specified they are likely to provide a never ending list of standards to be attained.  The result could be that legal educators and professionals ‘drown in a sea of competencies’, while the means by which such competencies will be assessed, and by whom, is uncertain. Will assessment be by the market, ‘traditional’ University law schools, vocational law schools, even venture capitalists? And how will such a market driven system impact on academic research? All these questions point to an even more fundamental, and long standing, issue – namely, what is, and what should be, the role of a legal education?  Should it – will it be able to - continue to seek to provide a liberal, humanist education designed primarily to inculcate a critical awareness of the meaning of law, including its ethical content and social role?  Or does the emphasis on the market inevitably mean that it will be explicitly tailored to the demands of the profession?  This is the logic of LETR’s recommendations, but it had great difficulty in divining the future of legal practice.  Some indications may be found in a recent paper by The Law Society of England and Wales and the results of the Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law’s “Innovating Justice” Project. Clearly, legal educators will need to understand the possible futures both for the professions and the Rule of Law.  However it is undeniable that this task is made more difficult by the dramatic changes the professions have undergone in recent years, which have served both to produce further fragmentation and make the future highly opaque. These ‘big’ questions generate practical, pedagogical issues.  For instance,  if legal service provision is to be dominated by new models of provision, modes of delivery and concerns with professional engagement, how will this impact on what is taught and how it is taught? Should systems thinking, design and big data be integrated into a legal curriculum?  And how should Law Schools respond to, on the one hand, the increased emphasis in universities on employability and, on the other, the growth in low wage, casual labour markets within the professions, markets which also appear to be predominantly populated by graduates from Black and Minority Ethnic and lower socio-economic backgrounds?  Does this reduce the legitimacy of legal education? Do Law Schools have an ethical obligation to warn applicants of the likely difficulties in entering the professions? In the United States this is now a high profile issue: Law Schools have been accused of promoting their ability to provide law jobs to graduates unfairly, and have seen a significant drop in applications, leading to a review of their whole approach. President Obama has suggested that a law degree should take two, rather than three postgraduate years. The Bologna Declaration for education in the EU suggests that educational systems throughout Europe should aim for three years of education plus two years of practical training. In England and Wales solicitors are already one year above this prescription. The WG Hart Workshop 2014 will provide some academic distance from LETR and professions’ and regulators’ responses. It represents an important opportunity to think about some of the issues identified above, and many other aspects of legal education and training and the professions. Abstracts of 300 words (and no more than 500 maximum) should be sent  by email attachment by Friday 31 March 2014 to IALS.WGHart@sas.ac.uk. The Academic Directors welcome contributions from early career researchers.   Registration fees will apply to the Workshop.  Travel bursaries may be available for junior researchers. For a copy of the Call for Papers, please click here. Adademic enquiries should be sent to the Workshop Directors: Professor Avrom Sherr:  avrom.sherr@sas.ac.uk Professor Richard Moorhead:  r.moorhead@ucl.ac.uk Professor Hilary Sommerlad:  h.a.k.sommerlad@bham.ac.uk   For general enquiries, of if  you are simply interested in attending the Workshop, please contact:  Belinda Crothers, Academic Programmes Manager, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR.  Email: Belinda.Crothers@sas.ac.uk.     
IALS

Wednesday 25 June 2014

TimeTitleVenue
12:00 Of Higher Intentions and Lower Expectations – A report about a failed comparative survey project on maqasid al-shari’ah
Professor Michael Bohlander, Professor of Comparative and Internaitonal Criminal Law, University of Durham; Sir William Dale Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Legislative Studies, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.
The paper will address a failed questionnaire survey with Muslim scholars planned to allow a case-based approach to comparing the so-called higher intentions of Islamic law with the guiding principles of secular legal systems, at the example of German and English law, as opposed to the much more theoretical and even philosophical discussions that pervade the debate so far. This questionnaire was meant as a case-based contribution to a wider research project on the topic of whether Shari’ah law solutions to common scenarios in private, criminal and public law differ in argument and/or result from those reached in secular legal systems, and if so, how. To my knowledge, nothing like this has been undertaken before and the Muslim colleagues would have been participating in an effort to enhance the mutual knowledge about the respective systems rather than merely presenting one’s own system as is mainly the case so far. In the questionnaire I omitted any questions which relate to the obviously controversial fields such as the position of women or anything to do with freedom of religion and expression. The scenarios are taken from everyday situations as they can arise in any legal system and have a bearing on the way that system’s general legal principles affect the solution to a case. Some of them are based on real cases decided in Germany and/or England and Wales. Apart from three Iranian Shi’a scholars, not one of my Sunni Muslim colleagues so far answered the questionnaire and hardly anyone reacted to the request for support at all. The answers from the three Iranian colleagues were rather brief, however, and did not allow for a proper reference to Shari’ah sources. I have tentative ideas about why this might have happened. The paper will present the research project and offer a tentative diagnosis why it failed. It is hoped that the discussion will help develop alternative explanations. The paper is thus very much meant to be interactive.
IALS
17:30 Exploring the European Union Legal Implications of the Scottish Referendum Outcome
Professor Sir David Edward KCMG QC FRSE; and, Professor Paul Beaumont FRSE. 
This meeting will focus on the legal implications of the Scottish Referendum with particular consideration given to the European Union implications of both a ‘yes’ and a ‘no’ vote outcome. Speakers:  Professor Sir David Edward KCMG QC FRSE, Former Judge of the Court of Justice of the European Union; Emeritus Professor of European Law and former Director of the Europa Institute at the University of Edinburgh; Professor Paul Beaumont FRSE, Chair of European Union and Private International Law, University of Aberdeen; has extensive experience representing Scotland and the UK in the European Union, and the EU in international negotiations in The Hague. Chair:  Professor Joanne Scott FRSE FBA, Professor of European Law, University College London. The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies acknowledges with gratitude the support of The Royal Society of Edinburgh. If you wish to attend please register in advance using the reply form below, or email IALS.Events@sas.ac.uk. ADMISSION FREE – ALL WELCOME
IALS
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